HomeVideoAbout/Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation/Nashville/Curing Type 1 Diabetes

About/Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation/Nashville/Curing Type 1 Diabetes



JDRF is the leading global organization focused on type 1 diabetes (T1D) research. Driven by passionate, grassroots volunteers connected to children, adolescents, and adults with this disease, JDRF is now the largest charitable supporter of T1D research. The goal of JDRF research is to improve the lives of all people affected by T1D by accelerating progress on the most promising opportunities for curing, better treating, and preventing T1D. JDRF collaborates with a wide spectrum of partners who share this goal.
JDRF aims to find new ways to treat type 1 diabetes and its complications, prevent type 1 from developing and find the cure for people who already have the condition. Health Care & Social Assistance sector comprises firms providing health care and social assistance for individuals. The sector includes both health care and social assistance because it is sometimes difficult to distinguish between the boundaries of these two activities. The industries in this sector are arranged on a continuum starting with providing medical care exclusively, continuing with those providing health care and social assistance and finally finishing with only social assistance. The services provided in this sector are delivered by trained health practitioners and social workers with requisite experience. Nashville has a humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa), with moderately cold winters, and hot, humid summers. Monthly averages range from 37.7 °F (3.2 °C) in January to 79.4 °F (26.3 °C) in July, with a diurnal temperature variation of 18.2 to 23.0 °F (10.1 to 12.8 °C). In the winter months, snowfall does occur in Nashville, but is usually not heavy. Average annual snowfall is about 6.3 inches (16 cm), falling mostly in January and February and occasionally March and December. The largest snow event since 2000 was on January 22, 2016, when Nashville received 8 inches (20 cm) of snow in a single storm; the largest on record was 17 inches (43 cm), received on March 17, 1892. Rainfall is typically greater in November and December, and spring, while August to October are the driest months on average. Spring and fall are generally warm but prone to severe thunderstorms, which occasionally bring tornadoes—with recent major events on April 16, 1998; April 7, 2006; February 5, 2008; April 10, 2009; and May 1–2, 2010. People with T1D would never benefit from JDRF-funded innovations without our donors. The work to create transformational therapies to help people live with T1D cannot—and must not—be allowed to stop because dedicated researchers lack funds. Laboratory studies that are unlocking the mysteries of T1D and accelerating progress toward a cure and prevention must continue. With the generous help of supporters like you, JDRF is pursuing a diversified, dynamic research agenda that is moving us ever closer to a world without T1D.
If you live with T1D, you spend a lot of time thinking about your blood-sugar levels now and worrying about the complications that T1D may one day bring. You don’t want anyone else you love to ever know the physical, emotional and financial toll this disease takes. You want a cure. See full list of Video Credits http://broadcaster.beazil.net/public/credits/youtube/videos/41656 JDRF is the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes (T1D) research. JDRF’s goal is to progressively remove the impact of T1D from people’s lives until we achieve a world without T1D. JDRF has led the search for a cure for T1D since our founding in 1970. In those days, people commonly called the disease “juvenile diabetes” because it was frequently diagnosed in, and strongly associated with, young children. Our organization began as the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation. Later, to emphasize exactly how we planned to end the disease, we added a word and became the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.Today, we know an equal number of children and adults are diagnosed every day—approximately 110 people per day.
In summary, here are the main points:
Beta Cell Regeneration,diabetes diagnosis,take action,Insulin Pump,Pre- Diabetes,HAPO Study,diabetes risk assessment,Insulin Pump Therapy,Long Acting Insulin,insulin aspart,antihyperglycemic agents,insulin pen,charity,Cure Diabetes,Minneapolis of the South,T1D Mentors,patient self-monitoring of blood glucose,Insulin,Research,Oral Glucose Tolerance Test,Recipe Swap,rapid insulin injection,maturity-onset diabetes of the young,transplantation insulin-secreting cells,The Automation to Simulate Pancreatic Insulin Response Trial,injection site rotation,ultralente insulin,Non-Profit Organization,adult-onset diabetes,heart attack,blood glucose level,juvenile-onset diabetes,diabetes prevention program,World diabetes day,glyburide,glucose,Immune System,Cure research,storing insulin,fundraise,longer-acting sulfonylureas,contribute,inhaled insulin,JDRF,noninsulin treated patients,UK Prospective Diabetes Study,treatment therapies,Grassroots.

source

Previous post
[How To]-Accredited Charity-Lubbock-Researching Type 1 Diabetes
Next post
BERGEN COUNTY NEW JERSEY NJ PROSECUTORS CALL 201-848-8000 SAME DAY EXAM AND RELIEF CARE

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of
avatar
wpDiscuz