HomeResearchChallenges to Healthy Eating Practices: A Qualitative Study of Non-Hispanic Black Men Living With Diabetes

Challenges to Healthy Eating Practices: A Qualitative Study of Non-Hispanic Black Men Living With Diabetes

Challenges to Healthy Eating Practices

A Qualitative Study of Non-Hispanic Black Men Living With Diabetes

  1. Loretta T. Lee, PhD, FNP-BC
  2. Amanda L. Willig, PhD, RD
  3. April A. Agne, MPH, BA
  4. Julie L. Locher, PhD
  5. Andrea L. Cherrington, MD, MPH
  1. School of Nursing, Acute, Chronic, and Continuing Care (Dr Lee), University of Alabama at Birmingham
  2. Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases (Dr Willig), University of Alabama at Birmingham
  3. Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive Medicine (Ms Agne, Dr Cherrington), University of Alabama at Birmingham
  4. School of Public Health, Department of Health Care Organization and Policy (Dr Locher), University of Alabama at Birmingham
  1. Loretta T. Lee, PhD, FNP-BC, University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Nursing, Acute, Chronic, and Continuing Care, 1720 2nd Avenue South, NB 542, Birmingham, AL 35294-1210, USA (llee{at}uab.edu)

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore current dietary practices and perceived barriers to healthy eating in non-Hispanic black men with type 2 diabetes.

Methods Four 90-minute focus groups held in September and October 2011 were led by a trained moderator with a written guide to facilitate discussion on dietary practices and barriers to healthy eating. Participants were recruited from the diabetes database at a public safety-net health system in Jefferson County, Alabama. Two-independent reviewers performed content analysis to identify major themes using a combined deductive and inductive approach.

Results There were 34 male participants aged 18 years and older. Mean years living with diabetes was 9.6 ± 5.9. Sixty-two percent of participants perceived themselves to be in fair or poor health. Participants’ self-reported eating practices did not always relate to hunger. Internal cues to eat included habit and response to emotions, and external cues to eat included media messaging, medication regimens, and work schedules. Men identified multiple barriers to healthy eating including hard-to-break habits, limited resources and availability of food at home and in neighborhood grocery stores, and perceived poor communication with health care professionals.

Conclusion Non-Hispanic black men acknowledged the importance of healthy eating as part of diabetes self-management but reported various internal and external challenges that present barriers to healthy eating. Tailored strategies to overcome barriers to healthy eating among non-Hispanic black men should be developed and tested for their impact on diabetes self-management.

Article Notes

  • Funding: This project was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Diabetes Research Center (P60 DK079626 to Andrea L. Cherrington and Timothy Garvey [Director of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham]) and the American Diabetes Association (Dr Cherrington). This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging Translational Nutrition and Aging Research Academic Career Leadership Award (K07AG043588 to Julie L. Locher). Amanda L. Willig received financial support from a National Institutes of Health Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (grant 5T32AI52069-08SI), the Mary Fisher Care Fund, and the UAB-VA Health Services Research/Comparative Effectiveness Research Training Program.

  • © 2016 The Author(s)

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