HomeResearchHispanic Acculturation and Gender Differences in Support and Self-Efficacy for Managing Diabetes

Hispanic Acculturation and Gender Differences in Support and Self-Efficacy for Managing Diabetes

Hispanic Acculturation and Gender Differences in Support and Self-Efficacy for Managing Diabetes

  1. Carol L. Mansyur, PhD
  2. Luis O. Rustveld, PhD
  3. Susan G. Nash, PhD
  4. Maria L. Jibaja-Weiss, EdD
  1. School of Community and Environmental Health, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia (Dr Mansyur)
  2. Department of Family and Community Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (Dr Rustveld, Dr Nash)
  3. School of Allied Health Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (Dr Jibaja-Weiss)
  4. Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (Dr Jibaja-Weiss)
  1. Carol L. Mansyur, PhD, School of Community and Environmental Health, Old Dominion University, 1014 West 46th Street, Room 1018, Norfolk, VA 23529, USA (cmansyur{at}odu.edu).

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether perceived support, social norms, and their association with self-efficacy varied by gender and language-based acculturation in Hispanic men and women with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

Methods A cross-sectional, secondary analysis of baseline survey data from a randomized control trial. Participants were 248 Hispanic patients from 4 community health centers who participated in a culturally targeted intervention for diabetes management. Quantitative statistical methods were used, including chi-square analyses, one-way ANOVA, and multiple regression.

Results Gender and language both moderated the relationship between social factors and self-efficacy. Regardless of language, better perceived support was associated with improved self-efficacy in women but not men. Dietary norms were associated with self-efficacy in English-speaking men and women, while physical activity norms were associated with self-efficacy for Spanish-speaking women only.

Conclusions This study builds on previous research by exploring the extent to which the social context of diabetes self-management may vary in its effects depending on gender and acculturation. The findings revealed potentially important differences based on both gender and language, suggesting that interventions must be designed with these differences in mind. Diabetes-specific support from family members, especially spouses, may be especially important for Hispanic women. For both men and women, it may be effective to find creative ways of involving the family in creating healthier social norms and expectations.

Article Notes

  • Funding: The parent study was generously underwritten by Ms Trinidad Mendenhall. The first author was supported in part by National Research Service Award T32 HP10031-12.

  • © 2016 The Author(s)

Original Article

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