HomeResearchInfluence of Patient-Centered Decision Making on Sustained Weight Loss and Risk Reduction Following Lifestyle Intervention Efforts in Rural Pennsylvania

Influence of Patient-Centered Decision Making on Sustained Weight Loss and Risk Reduction Following Lifestyle Intervention Efforts in Rural Pennsylvania

Influence of Patient-Centered Decision Making on Sustained Weight Loss and Risk Reduction Following Lifestyle Intervention Efforts in Rural Pennsylvania

  1. Gretchen A. Piatt, PhD
  2. Miriam C. Seidel, MS
  3. Robert O. Powell, PhD
  4. Janice C Zgibor, PhD
  1. Department of Learning Health Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (Dr Piatt)
  2. Chatham University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Ms Seidel)
  3. Department of Exercise Science, Marshall University, Huntington, West Virginia (Dr Powell)
  4. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Florida College of Public Health, Tampa, Florida (Dr Zgibor)
  1. Gretchen A. Piatt, MPH, PhD, Department of Learning Health Sciences, University of Michigan, 1111 E Catherine St, Victor Vaughan, Rm 227, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 piattg{at}umich.edu).

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether weight loss and cardiovascular disease risk factor reduction was maintained following a lifestyle intervention.

Methods Five hundred fifty-five individuals without diabetes from 8 rural communities were screened for BMI ≥25 kg/m2 and abdominal obesity (86.1% female, 95.1% white, 55.8% obese). Communities and eligible participants (n = 493; mean age, 51 years, 87.6% female, 94.1% Caucasian) were assigned to 4 study groups: face-to-face, DVD, Internet, and self-selection (SS) (n = 101). Self-selection participants chose the intervention modality (60% face-to-face, 40% Internet, 0% DVD). Outcomes included weight change and risk factor reduction at 18 months.

Results All groups achieved maintenance of 5% weight loss in over half of participants. Self-selection participants had the largest proportion maintain (89.5%). Similarly, nearly 75% of participants sustained risk factor reduction. After multivariate adjustment, participants in SS were 2.3 times more likely to maintain 5% weight loss compared to the other groups, but not risk factor reduction.

Conclusion Despite the modality, lifestyle intervention was effective at maintaining weight loss and risk reduction. However, SS participants were twice as likely to sustain improvements compared to other groups. The importance of patient-centered decision making in health care is paramount.

Article Notes

  • Funding: This work utilized the Technology and Intervention Core of the Michigan Center for Diabetes Translational Research (MCDTR) funded by Grant Number P30DK092926 from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

  • © 2016 The Author(s)

Original Article

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